Allocating subsurface risk is always a key point of negotiation between owners and contractors in engineering, procurement, and construction (“EPC”) contracts, given its potential price and schedule impacts. Parties can utilize contractual, practical, and creative approaches to address subsurface risk, both before and after EPC contract execution.

As the shift from fossil-based energy production to renewable energy sources continues, growth in renewable energy projects under development has been staggering. But moving projects from early-stage development to commercial operations requires navigating complicated methods of financing their development, construction, and operation via structures that vary depending on project ownership, size, technology, and the regulatory environment. 

Developers of renewable energy projects, many of which are built on agricultural land, should understand local laws and restrictions on foreign ownership and investment in these parcels.  Roughly half of US States have express limits on foreign investment in or purchase of privately held agricultural land. A large swath of the Midwest, plus states in the mid-Atlantic and Florida, among others, have some restrictions. Between January and June of 2023, fifteen states enacted restrictions on foreign ownership of land.

Among the benefits afforded the renewable energy sector by the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022, the ability to monetize 11 new or expanded clean energy tax credits via direct transfer was especially interesting to developers because of its potential to eliminate costly, drawn-out tax equity transactions.

Investors were also eager to participate in the newly

This blog post is the second part of a series on incentives available to Missouri solar developers in the wake of Johnson v. Springfield Solar 1, LLC, 648 S.W.3d 101 (Mo. 2022). For part one on Missouri Chapter 100 bond abatements and the Springfield Solar 1, LLC decision, click here.

Enhanced Enterprise Zones

Virginia developers take note: changes to the Virginia stormwater construction permitting program have been made over the last few years, and more changes are expected in upcoming months. While navigating those changes, Virginia developers will also want to be aware of all the requirements when applying for stormwater construction permits in Virginia to expedite the process and ensure a timely-issued permit.

Last month, we reported how a key component of project finance—syndicated term loans—was the subject of a crucial case being heard in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. In Kirschner v. JP Morgan Chase, the plaintiff contended that the term loans at issue were in fact securities that should be regulated

Syndicated term loans can be a significant piece of the capital stack when financing renewable energy projects; however, a crucial pending case in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit could complicate the use of these types of loans going forward. The case—Kirschner v. JP Morgan Chase—will seek to answer the central question at play: are syndicated term loans subject to federal and state securities laws?  The eventual ruling in this case could potentially impact any borrower or lender issuing or holding a term loan in a syndicated facility.