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After two years assisting and regulating various industries, Daniel applies his prior experience as a wastewater pretreatment coordinator to assisting clients with environmental issues. Daniel enjoys working with various entities to help them understand how to comply with environmental regulations and statutes. In addition, he represents clients in court or in front of various agencies when necessary. In particular, Daniel has experience with permitting, reporting, inspecting and working with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Virginia developers take note: changes to the Virginia stormwater construction permitting program have been made over the last few years, and more changes are expected in upcoming months. While navigating those changes, Virginia developers will also want to be aware of all the requirements when applying for stormwater construction permits in Virginia to expedite the process and ensure a timely-issued permit.

On January 18, 2023, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) and the Department of the Army published a new final rule to re-define “waters of the United States” (“WOTUS”) under the Federal Clean Water Act (“CWA”). Although the rule is set to take effect March 20, 2023, the looming U.S. Supreme Court decision in Michael Sackett, et ux v. EPA, et al., Docket No. 21-454(2022) could establish additional legal precedent as to what constitutes WOTUS and could enable further legal challenges to the rule. If the rule goes into effect, it would broaden the types of water bodies subject to CWA regulation, while providing some clarity with regard to some newly excluded water features.

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (“PFAS”) are synthetic chemicals used in a number of industrial processes and in the manufacturing of certain consumer goods because of their fire resistance and because they repel oil, stains, grease, and water. There are approximately 3,500 different compounds under the umbrella of PFAS. Some of these were used in firefighting foam, which in some places, including near airports, were spread over the ground to prevent forest fires. The most well-known versions, and considered to be of greatest concern, are long chain PFAS, perfluoroctanoic acid (“PFOA”) and perfluoroctane sulfonate (“PFOS”).